From the Oxford English Dictionary

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bombast, v. arch.
[f. prec. n., which see for pronunciation: in the vb. the accent is more frequently on the final syllable.]
† 1. To stuff, pad, or fill out with cotton-wool, or the like. Obs.
1565 Jewel Repl. Harding (1611) To Rdr. 2 To couer the smalnesse..of their bodies, [he] had bomebasted, and embossed out their coates.
1576 Gascoigne Steele Gl. Epil. 82 [They] bumbast, bolster, frisle and perfume.
2. fig. and transf. To stuff, swell out, inflate.
1566
J. Studley Seneca’s Medea (1581) 136 Her hawty breast bumbasted is wyth pryde.
1599 Nashe Lent. Stuffe (1871) 58 The first should have his gut bombasted with beef.
1607 Chapman Bussy D’Amb. Plays 1873 II. 43 A great man..that by his greatnesse Bumbasts his private roofes, with public riches.
b. To swell out, render grandiose (a speech or literary composition) with bombastic language.
1573
R. Scot Hop Gard. (1578) Epist., Not bumbasting the same with the figures and flowers of eloquence.
1599 Bp. Hall Sat. i. iv. 9 Then strives he to bumbast his feeble lines With farre-fetcht phrase.
1603 Florio Montaigne i. xxv. (1632) 83 That doth..bumbast his labours with high swelling and heaven-disimbowelling words.

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factotum (__________).
[ad. med.L. factotum (f. fac, imper. of facere to do + totum the whole) in phrases Johannes Factotum, Dominus Factotum, Magister factotum, which appear to be renderings in etymological equivalents of Romanic expressions = ‘John Do-everything’, ‘Mr. Do-Everything’; cf. It. fa il tutto, fattutto of similar formation. These phrases are found in 16th c. in Eng., and Frère Jean Factotum (Paré a 1590), Dominus Factotum also in Fr.; their source has not yet been discovered. The word factotum without the prefixed words is used in German (as neuter n.) from 16th c. (Grimm cites Fischart 1579), and in Fr. and It. from 17th c.]
1. † a. In L. phrases: Dominus factotum, used for ‘one who controls everything’, a ruler with uncontrolled power; Johannes factotum, a Jack of all trades, a would-be universal genius. Also fig.
† b. One who meddles with everything, a busybody.
c. In mod. sense: A man of all-work; also, a servant who has the entire management of his master’s affairs.
1566 Gascoigne Supposes iii. iv. (1572) 31 He had the disbursing..of al my masters affaires..he was Magister fac totum. [Ariosto 1525: era fa il tutto.]
1584 R. Parsons Leicester’s Commw. 65 Throughout all England my L. of Leycester is taken for Dominus fac totum.
1592 Greene Groatsw. Wit E iv, Being an absolute Johannes fac totum [he] is in his owne conceit the onely Shake-scene in a Countrey.
1618 S. Ward Serm. Exod. xviii. 21­22, 65 Is there no mean between busibodies and tell-clockes, between fac-totum and fay’t neant?

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upstart (________), n. and a.
[up- 2, 3.]
A. n.
1. One who has newly or suddenly risen in position or importance; a new-comer in respect of rank or consequence; a parvenu; = start-up ppl. a. and n.1 1.
1555 Instit. Gentl. C iiij b, These gentlemen are nowe called vpstartes, a terme lately inuented by such as pondered not ye groundes of honest meanes of rising or commyng to promocion.
1577 B. Googe Heresbach’s Husb. i. 46 b, The newe vpstart; that takes vpon him the name of a gentleman.
1592 Greene Vpst. Courtier B 4, Mary gyp goodman vp~start, who made your father a gentleman?
B. adj.
1. a. Of things: Lately come into existence or notice; new-fangled.
1565
Stapleton Fortr. Faith 9 The grounde and foundation of all your vpsterte ghospell.
Ibid. 94 Their small secret, and late vpstert congregation.
1593 Bilson Govt. Christ’s Ch. 286 This up-start fansie is far from God’s ordinance.
1607 J. Norden Surv. Dial. i. 18 Surveying..is an upstart arte found out of late.
b. Characteristic of upstarts.
1593
Marlowe Edw. II, i. iv. 336 Think you that we can brooke this vpstart pride?
1603 B. Jonson Sejanus v. viii, It is a note Of vpstart greatnesse, to..watch For these poore trifles.
2. Of persons, families, etc.: Lately or suddenly risen to prominence or dignity.
1566
Stapleton Ret. Untr. Jewel i. 8 Your late vpstert masters of Germany and Geneua.
1586 J. Ferne Blaz. Gentrie 260 He will..passe vp and downe the streates of London in a side gowne, like vnto some newe vp-start Legist.
† 3. Rising on end. Obs.1
1590
Spenser F.Q. iii. x. 54 He..ran away,..With vp~start haire, and staring eyes dismay.
Hence
'upstartism, 'upstartness. nonce-wds.

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